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How rest between reps influences your snatch performance?

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Summary of a study investigating the influence of rest length on snatch performance.

Who

15 male athletes aged 23.0±2.31 years with a ratio of 1RM snatch to body weight at 0.78±0.12 with at least 6 months of experience (Malaysia).

Design

Experimental study: 4 visits in a laboratory (each session separated by 72 hours):

  • session 1: 1RM snatch
  • session 2-4: 3 sets of 5 reps of snatch at 85%, 5 minutes rest between sets, 10s or 30s or 50 s rests between each rep.

Outcome measures/tests

  • peak velocity at ankle, knee, and hip
  • ground reaction force

Main results

How rest between reps influences your snatch performance - infographic

  • In the first pull, rests or repetitions did not significantly affect ankle, knee or hip joint velocity, apart from the case when angular velocity decreased between 1st and 5th rep at 10 seconds rest.

  • In the second pull, rests or repetitions did not significantly affect ankle and hip joint velocity, apart from the case when angular velocity decreased between 1st and 5th rep at 10 seconds rest. Knee velocity was not affected by rests or repetitions.

  • Peak ground reaction force did not change with the rest length changes. Peak ground reaction force reduced between 1st and 5th repetition at 10 seconds rest.

Take home message

For a clinician & coach
Overall, increasing rest between each of 5 snatch repetitions at 85% from 10s to 30s to 50s did not have a significant effect on the ankle, knee, or hip joint velocities nor ground reaction force. The only significant differences found were between 1st and 5th rep with 10s rest: the velocity decreased along with ground reaction force. Shorter rests (10s and less) will build fatigue over the reps (from the 1st to 5th repetition). If the focus of the session is on training speed, longer rests between reps can allow for sustaining a fast performance.
For a parent
Shorter rests (10s and less) will build fatigue over the reps (from the 1st to 5th repetition). If the focus of the session is on training speed, longer rests between reps can allow for sustaining a fast performance.
For an athlete
Shorter rests (10s and less) will build fatigue over the reps (from the 1st to 5th repetition). If the focus of the session is on training speed, longer rests between reps can allow for sustaining a fast performance.

Original article

Tan K, Pagaduan J, Janep M, Nadzalan AM. Changes in joint kinematics and kinetics through the implementation of inter-repetition rest protocols in snatch training. Pedagogy of Physical Culture and Sports. 2022 Feb 28;26(1):68-75.

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